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Altered Alphabet Tiles

by Sara Naumann


Shauna used tiles from Alphabet Tiles #2, embossed tags from Blank Tags Embossed Paper Tags and paper from Mixing Words & Textures

Shauna used tiles from Alphabet Tiles #2, embossed tags from Blank Tags Embossed Paper Tags and paper from Mixing Words & Textures

Chalking. Tearing. Distressing. Or just using them as is. There are so many creative things you can do with alphabet tile Cut-Outs that you cant do with stickers! We asked Alphabet Tile Queen Shauna Berglund-Immel, author of Shaunas Secrets of Scrapbooking, to divulge her tricks and techniques for altering alphabet tiles.

Shaunas layout, My Dad, features several of our favorite altered alphabet tile techniquesall on one page. Because the letters are printed on acid-free, lignin-free paper, she was able to easily cut and tear them outsince theyre not glossy or coated like stickers, she can chalk or sand them. And because Shauna kept the rest of her layout simple and streamlined, the page never looks cluttered or busy, even when mixing seven different styles of tiles.

For a cool, artsy look, check out Shaunas Ten Techniques for Altering Alphabet Tiles.

Altered Alphabet Technique #1: Chalking

Want letters that perfectly match your paper? Try chalking, as Shauna did with GREAT. The original letters are black and white; Shauna chalked the center with tan, creating a soft look that perfectly matches her background paper and the rustic theme of the page.

Altered Alphabet Technique #2: Mounting with Foam Tape

When adding the word THINGS to her layout, Shauna used foam mounting tape on the T and N dog tag letters. It adds just another subtle touch to her page and differentiates between the gray letters.

Altered Alphabet Technique #3: Tearing

Who says Cut-Outs have to be cut out? Not Shauna, who tore out the letters of the whimsical newspaper-style alphabet to add a bit of texture to the word THINGS.

Altered Alphabet Technique #4: Distressing

After Shauna tore out the newsprint I and S, she crumpled them up, unfolded them and gently sanded each letter with fine-grade sandpaper. Because the letters are paper, its easy to create a vintage, distressed look thats perfect for masculine pages.

Altered Alphabet Technique #5: Using Them As Is

You can also use these alphabet tiles as isin fact, Shauna simply cut out the H and G of THINGS, trimmed them into circles and glued them right to the page. Shauna opts for repositionable adhesive when adding alphabet tiles to her background paper. With stickers, youre kind of stuck when you put them down, she says. With paper tiles and some Hermafix, you can better position your lettersand reposition them if you need to.

Altered Alphabet Technique #6: Tagging

An Embossed Paper Charm Tag or two is a super way to accent a word or a single letter, as Shauna did here. She placed the entire chalked GREAT word on one giant embossed charm tag. Shauna also tagged the letter C in ACT, attaching the letter to the embossed tag charm with glue, then attaching the tag to the page with foam tape.

Altered Alphabet Technique #7: Double Journaling

Vellum and alphabet tiles are perfect together, as Shauna shows in the word DREAM. She layered a 6 wide piece of tan vellum on top of her striped background paper. On the vellum, Shauna hand-wrote the rest of her journaling. She arranged the alphabet tile words on the striped paper, so that her script DREAM is layered on top of her alphabet tile DREAM.

Altered Alphabet Technique #8: Inking

Shauna applied a rubber stamping technique called direct to paper to alter the postage stamp alphabet tile. Heres how: Place the alphabet tile on a scrap piece of paper to protect your work surface. Place the ink pad directly onto the alphabet tile. Tap it gently for light coverage. Repeat for additional coverage.

Altered Alphabet Technique #9: Drop-Capping

Shauna even incorporated alphabet tiles in her typewritten journaling. In graphic design, this effect is called a Drop Cap (for capital) and its a great way to add variety to a text block. When you type or write your journaling, be sure to allow space at the side and the top for the letter. Shauna chose a small shipping tag alphabet tile, and attached it with foam tape.

Altered Alphabet Technique #10: Mixing

A combination of different fonts is one of the newest looks in scrapbooking. And with a collection of alphabet tile letters, you can mix and match letters like Shauna did here. Even better, one collection of alphabet tile cut-outs(Alphabet Tiles #1 or Alphabet Tiles #2) contains 13 styles of tiles, ready for you to chalk, ink, distress or simply use as is.

Thanks, Shauna, for sharing your great altering techniques with us!

If youre interested in altering alphabet tiles, check out our two collections: Alphabet Tiles #1 and Alphabet Tiles #2. Each collection includes 13 different styles of tiles, making each complete alphabet about 70 cents. Each alphabet includes at least two of every letter, multiples of the most popular letters, plus numbers. To learn more about Shaunas designer style, see her scrapbooking idea book, Shaunas Secrets of Scrapbooking.